Juul bought ads appearing on Cartoon Network and other sites

The news came into limelight when Massachusetts claimed and presented the strongest pieces of evidence of the vaping products targeting teenagers on the youth sites.

However, Juul neglected the claims by acclaiming that the vaping company never marketed such products to teenagers. World’s top youth-focused sites including cartoon network, nickelodeon and seventeen magazines and other educational sites for middle and high school students.

The suit was brought by Maura Healey, the state’s attorney general. She presented some of the starkest shreds of evidence to prove that the company was targeting the young generation.

Juul executives didn’t pay any heed to the complains, even Austin Finan issued a statement that they are doing their best to combat underage vaping, and transiting smokers from combustible cigarettes by working with regulators, stakeholders, and public health officials.

Juul rejected the proposals of the cult collective company of presenting the cigarettes in an outdated style. Instead, he hired an in-house interim art to create some interesting campaign featuring attractive models for the vaporized cigarettes.

Juul has become the target of the growing public anger as it provoked the medium and high school students making it fashionable for them. He was saved by his attorney’s statement that he was not doing it intentionally, as he was just helping the adults to adopt the better alternative then combustible cigarette smoking. Some of the websites where he promoted these ads are math-aids.com, basic-mathematics .com, mathsplayground.com, onlinemathlearning.com, purplemath.com, mathway.com, mathplayground.com, coolmaths.com, and socialstudiesforkids.com. For girls, games2girls.com, girlgames.com and high school students collegeconfidential.com, hellokids.com, and allfreekidscrfts.com.

California, Minnesota, Illinois, Arizona, North Carolina, Mississippi, and New York are the states that have sued Juul over its cheap marketing tactics and target young students.